Pediatricians playing key role in vaccine efforts as focus turns to kids

COVID-19’s vaccination efforts put pediatricians in a key role after the Food and Drug Administration approves vaccinations for children up to 12 years old. As vaccination begins to target children, many parents have specific questions. Some are more afraid of getting their children vaccinated than when they got the shot. “For the most part, people take better care of their children than themselves. So I think they are extending any fear they have about something new about this vaccine, they are now extending that to their children, “said Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Chief of Staff Dr. Patty Manning. Manning, who is a pediatrician, said people want to discuss the process if their kids are involved. “It is important to have that sounding board. Someone you trust, someone who is educated and knows the science, but also knows you. I don’t think that’s right, “said Manning.” I think we will become the information stop for families, “said St. Elizabeth pediatrician, Dr. John LaCount.” I think we can assure them that these are safe vaccines. They have been shown to do a lot of good and I think this is From our perspective it makes a lot of sense to move it to primary care. ”Some pediatricians are already seeing the vaccine, but it has only been a week from approval it is still spotty. Doctors expect vaccines to be more widely distributed among pediatricians soon .

COVID-19’s vaccination efforts put pediatricians in a key role after the Food and Drug Administration approves vaccinations for children up to 12 years old.

As vaccination assistance begins to focus more on children, many parents have specific questions. Some are more afraid of getting their children vaccinated than when they got the shot.

“People usually take better care of their children than themselves. So I think they are extending any fear they have of something new about this vaccine, they are now extending that to their children, ”said Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Chief of Staff Dr. Patty Manning.

Manning, who is a pediatrician, said people want to go through the process if their kids are involved.

“It is important to have that sounding board. Someone you trust, someone who is educated and knows the science, but also knows you. I don’t think that’s right, ”Manning said.

“I think we will be the information stop for families,” said St. Elizabeth, pediatrician Dr. John LaCount. “I think we can assure them that these are safe vaccines. They have been shown to do a lot of good and I think this makes a lot of sense from our perspective to move it to primary care. “

Some pediatricians are already seeing the vaccine, but it’s still spotty just a week after approval. Doctors expect vaccines will soon be more widely distributed among pediatricians.

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