Celiac screening rates in pediatric patients not linked to ethnicity

Source/Disclosures

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Hailey C, et al. Abstract 164. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-23, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures:
Hailey reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other author’s relevant financial disclosures.

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Ethnicity was not associated with celiac disease screening in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week.

“The co-occurrence of celiac disease and type 1 diabetes has been well-documented in the Caucasian population. However, the prevalence of both diseases in people of non-white populations is understudied,” Claire Hailey, MD, University of Chicago pediatrics, said. “As you may well know, multiple gastroenterology and endocrinology organizations and societies recommend routine screening for celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes, yet it is unclear whether providers consistently follow these recommendations.”

To evaluate the celiac disease screening processes for pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes, researchers retrospectively reviewed the charts of 55 patients (45% girls; 53% white non-Hispanic) treated in the pediatric department at the University of Chicago. Analysis revealed 54 patients underwent celiac disease screening since their diabetes diagnosis (average age, 8.4 years) with a median 0.95 years between diagnosis and screening among white patients vs. a median 0.24 years among non-white patients. Screenings identified nine patients with elevated celiac disease diagnostics and four diagnoses; all patients diagnosed with celiac disease were white.

“Looking ahead, we will be increasing the sample size for this research study and, ideally, will be including additional research populations, expanding our research to other hospitals and other clinic sites; in this way we hope that we will ensure appropriate diversification that is reflective of the national population in the U.S.,” Hailey concluded. “Our future research will investigate whether both the diagnostic approaches and the outcomes for patients with both celiac disease and type 1 diabetes differ based on ethnicity.”

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Digestive Disease Week

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